Walter, isn’t it a shame how our little world has changed?


While I didn’t get to spend as much time with Walter as I would have liked, I will always treasure the times we had.

Men rarely live half the life he did and better men are even twice as rare that. Speaking of men, it sure seemed Walter preferred the company of animals over people.  Why not? Animals are always nice. People aren’t.

That man sure loved the hell out of his family. I sure wish I got Erin up to Montana just one last time. I guess one thing he’d get, its being broke. If its two things he’d get, its being broke and looking good being broke.

Walter was always happy to see you and never applied the guilt trips like it wasn’t enough time or it’d been too long. I appreciated that. My parents like the guilt, it’s always with the ‘you’re only staying for a week?’ with them. But I digress.

I’ll always carry a comb for ya, Walter.

I’ll always miss you too.

The only good news is, out of it all, ya beat the system. Lets see ’em collect your hospital bills now!

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About Josh Latta

Mr Josh Latta was born in 1853 to a family of tamed Pleistocenes. he was raised as a small child, entering into adulthood on the eve of his 7th birthday as was the tradition of the day. in 1867 he undertook a course in multi-reptile wrestling ending his career as 'croc-tussler' after an unfortunate shallow-river related accident cut short the life of a young crocodile. moving to rural Sheboigan in the fall of 1872, he made a good living raising fancy roosters and painting murals across the town depicting the various lascivious secrets of the townsfolk. driven out of town in the spring of 1873 he found his way to Utah where he was Flaneur in Residence at the Foundation of Gentlemen and Cultured Guinea Pigs (now the Foundation of Water Fowl and Cultured Guinea Pigs) until a scandal involving twin milkmaids and a churn of cream called for his resignation. Latta entered into the history books in 1899 for his lifesize construction of Monument Valley in matches.